Course Materials and Copyright

Considerations for making course materials available (including copyright considerations) are mostly the same whether teaching in-person or online via a Learning Management System such as VIULearn.

Please see the guide below for answers to common questions about making course materials available to your students.

Further information and support

For library materials, contact your Liaison Librarian or research.help@viu.ca
For copyright questions, contact copyright@viu.ca
For textbooks and coursepacks, please see Campus Store faculty resources

Course Materials and Copyright Guide

Order textbooks through the Campus Store’s VIU Textbook Adoption. If you have any questions regarding textbook adoptions, contact Debbie Richards at Debbie.Richards@viu.ca

If you have decided to adopt an Open Textbook for your course, please note that the Campus Store will offer printed copies of your BC Open Digital Textbook for purchase.

The physical bookstore is currently closed, but the e-commerce site is operational for physical and digital items with home delivery and social distancing pick-up available at the store.

Please note that due to publisher restrictions, most digital textbooks cannot be made available through the Library. Also, due to necessary materials quarantining procedures for Fall 2020, the Library will not be able to place instructor copies of print textbooks on course reserve for short-term loan.

There may be some restrictions on using textbook supplementary materials in VIULearn. Consult the Terms of Use for the supplementary materials or contact the textbook publisher. You may be able to include material based on the Fair Dealing Exception in the Copyright Act. Contact copyright@viu.ca

Order custom courseware through the Campus Store’s VIU Custom Courseware Adoption. If you have any questions regarding custom courseware, contact Janice Speed at Janice.Speed@viu.ca

The Campus Store is diligently working to make as many materials available digitally as possible to accommodate the shift to online learning, including offering a digital option, along with the physical option, for all custom courseware.

Please note that many library-licensed materials may be used in coursepacks. Contact your Liaison Librarian or research.help@viu.ca to confirm if the material is licensed for coursepack use.

VIULearn is an excellent choice for student access to course materials that also helps with copyright matters because it is secure, password-protected, and only accessible by students enrolled in your course.

The easiest method to provide access to course materials is to create a link in VIULearn.

For library materials, use a stable link. Consult VIU Library’s Stable Links Guide and CIEL’s Creating a Link in Content. Most library-licensed materials allow stable links. (Note that Harvard Business Review does not permit linking to articles under its license.)

For material on the internet, first ensure you are linking to a legitimate and reputable site and not to copyright-infringing material that has been posted without the consent of the copyright owner, and that might consequently be subject to take-down at any time. Read any website Terms of Use to make sure linking is not prohibited. Do not “frame” the other webpage content, and by the link you should also include a citation with the author, copyright owner, and source of the materials, to ensure it is clear the website content is not your own material and you are not affiliated with it.

In cases where a link is not available, you may upload course materials if

  • you are the copyright owner;
  • you have received permission from the copyright owner;
  • the material is in the public domain;
  • the material is licensed for such use (e.g., Library license) or has a permissive license (e.g., Creative Commons License); or
  • you have conducted a Fair Dealing analysis.

See relevant guide sections below for further information on requesting permission, public domain materials, and conducting a Fair Dealing analysis.

If you want to digitize physical materials to upload to VIULearn, there are several options, including:

  • Using phone apps (e.g., Genius Scan, Adobe Scan) to digitize materials, and using an OCR tool to make the digitized materials more accessible
  • Using VIU Print Services

In each case, when digitizing materials it is your responsibility to ensure you are complying with copyright laws and copying within the limits allowed. See the Fair Dealing Exception section below or contact copyright@viu.ca

Library Digital Materials

Posting stable links to Library materials in VIULearn (rather than uploading a PDF copy) ensures students are accessing the most recent version of an article and is more likely to be copyright compliant. Consult VIU Library’s Stable Links Guide and CIEL’s Creating a Link in Content. Read the license’s Terms of Use for materials to see if linking to or distributing digital copies to students is allowed. Example of the Terms of Use for a licensed journal.

The Library collection includes thousands of open access (OA) journal titles, as well as open books and other open content, that are selected for relevance to learning and scholarship at VIU. Find OA versions of materials using Library OA search and/or Google Scholar (VIU access).

For more information on OA and Open Education Resources (OERs), consult the VIU Library OA Guide

Library Print Materials

Library Collections: At this time, we are planning for access to the Library’s physical collections (print books and journals, DVDs, etc.) through catalogue holds combined with on-campus pickup or mail delivery. The Library will reassess options for accessing physical collections as the broader context evolves.

Course Reserves: If you need an article or book chapter from a print source in the Library collection to include as a digital course reading in your VIULearn course, please contact library.reserves@viu.ca. Library staff will scan the material and email it to you in PDF format. Please ensure your request is copyright compliant. See the Fair Dealing section below or contact copyright@viu.ca. Due to the need to quarantine materials before and after lending, the Library will not be able to offer course reserves for short-term loan during the Fall 2020 term. We will reassess options for Spring 2020 course reserves later in the fall.

The Library does not typically acquire course textbooks for the collection. Liaison librarians are happy to consult with faculty about alternatives to commercial textbooks, such as creating custom reading lists from resources already available through the Library, and finding Open Access (OA) materials, Open Education Resources (OERs), and Creative Commons licensed resources.

Always consult the Licenses/Terms of Use for Open Education Resources (OERs) or Open Access (OA) materials before use.

The Library collection includes thousands of OA journal titles, as well as open books and other open content, that are selected for relevance to learning and scholarship at VIU. Find OA versions of materials using Library OA search and/or Google Scholar (VIU access).

For more information on OA and OERs, consult the VIU Library OA Guide

You can browse BCCampus’s Open Textbooks 101 for guidance on available open textbooks and adoption processes. If you have decided to adopt a BC Open Digital Textbook for your course, the Campus Store will offer printed copies for purchase.

The easiest method is to provide a link to the material because this does not entail making a copy. First, ensure you are linking to a legitimate and reputable site and not to copyright-infringing material that has been posted without the consent of the copyright owner, and that might consequently be subject to take-down at any time. Read any website Terms of Use to make sure linking is not prohibited. Do not “frame” the other webpage content, and by the link you should also include a citation with the author, copyright owner, and source of the materials, to ensure it is clear the website content is not your own material and you are not affiliated with it.

Materials in the public domain are not copyright protected and you may copy and distribute them. However, finding and using public domain materials can be tricky. Consult this helpful Public Domain Guide.

If the materials or images are short excerpts that qualify for the Fair Dealing Exception, then you may use them in your slide decks and distribute them to your students. See the Fair Dealing section above or contact copyright@viu.ca

If the materials or images are in the public domain, then there is no copyright protection and you may use them. However, finding and using public domain materials can be tricky. Consult this helpful Public Domain Guide.

If the materials or images are permissively licensed (e.g., Creative Commons License) or open access, then you may use them in your slide decks according to their Terms of Use, which usually includes attribution among other terms.

The Library has films and videos that are licensed for use in courses, including online films and videos.

What can you do if you have a scheduled screening for a film that is not available online and your course is online-only?

If you would like to have your class view a film that is not available digitally through the Library, you may be able to conduct a virtual screening using the distance education exception in the Copyright Act (Section 30.01). Please contact copyright@viu.ca to find out what may (or may not) be possible.

Commercial streaming services such as Netflix, Crave, etc. are for individual users, who must comply with their Terms of Use. For example, you wouldn’t be able to show a Netflix film to students in the classroom. Outside of the classroom, if students are individual subscribers of a streaming service, then they would be able to watch a film independently with their own accounts. However, some students may not have access to those services and streaming services may have different content available in various countries.

If you want to show your students a video from the internet for an educational or training purpose, then you may show the video as long as

  • the video is available through the internet;
  • you did not break or circumvent a digital protection measure (digital lock) that restricts access to the work or to the internet site;
  • there is no clearly visible notice (not merely the copyright symbol) on the website or on the video itself that prohibits the use or reproduction of the video;
  • you do not suspect that the video was posted without the consent of the owner of the video; and
  • you identify the source of the work and, if available and applicable, the author, performer, maker, or broadcaster of the work. 

Note: Information for showing films and videos in the classroom will be updated when classes resume on campus.

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